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Review - Conway eWME 627 E-bike

Marcel 26. July 2017

Conway’s eWME 627 E-MTB is German engineering at its best. Read on to see how well this E-bike preforms on the trail.

This year the German bicycle manufacturer Conway introduced their new Enduro eWME (We Make Enduro) E-MTB in Riva del Garda, Italy. This peaked my interest, and with an invite to participate in a test ride, I also decided to take part in the Bosch E-MTB Challenge to see what this bike can really do.

Specifications

CONWAY eWME 627
Drivetrain Shimano E8000, 250 W max. power rating
Drivetrain Shimano li-ion, 36 V, 14 Ah, 504 Wh
Display Shimano, 3 levels, remote control, pushing aid
Sensors Pedal power + speed
Weight 20.6 kg
Fork RockShox Yari RC, 160 mm Maxle
Rear Shock RockShox Monarch Plus R
Rear Derailleur Shimano Deore XT RD-M8000 Shadow Plus

The Conway eWME 627 is a Pedelec, or low-powered E-bike. That means it only pumps out power when the rider is pedalling and has a max. speed of 25 km/h. These types of E-bikes are also referred to as bicycles with pedal-assist.

The battery is integrated and small enough to save on weight.

The battery is integrated and small enough to save on weight.

Based on their Enduro series WME, Conway added a Shimano Steps E-8000 to motorise the 140 mm and 160 mm travel models. Thanks to the compact Shimano motor, the developers were able to keep the chainstays short, which keeps the bikes super agile just like their other Enduro bikes. At 435 mm, the chainstays of the eWME are only 5 mm longer than their WME siblings. The head tube angle is also 1° steeper and the top tube is roughly 1 cm longer. The E-bike optimised version of the Enduro geometry keeps the eWME playful, agile and ready for the downhill.

“Compered to other full suspension E-bikes, our eWME does not compromise the bikes climbing ability to get the last little bit out of the downhill.”

Jens Steinhäuser (Conway Division Manager)

Display and operation

The display shows the current mode, which can be set to off, eco, trail and boost. Besides the mode, the display also shows speed, remaining battery life and the motor’s power output. The trigger on the left side switches between modes.

This trigger controls the modes.

This trigger controls the modes.

Sensor

The sensor located on the inside of the chainstay measures the speed of the bike with the help of a spoke magnet. This keeps the motor in check and prevents it from putting out power past the max. speed.

Drivetrain

A Shimano 1x11 drivetrain comes stock on the Conway eWME 627. It consist of an XT RD-M8000 rear derailleur, a SLX SL-M7000 shifter and a SLX CS-M7000 cassette.

The sensor keeps the motor’s power output in check.

The sensor keeps the motor’s power output in check.

A reliable Shimano drivetrain keeps shifting smooth.

A reliable Shimano drivetrain keeps shifting smooth.

Suspension

The RockShox Yari RC with 160 mm of travel offers the necessary plush when riding downhill. Coupled with a RockShox Monarch Plus R rear shock, they both make for a solid suspension system.

The rear shock specifications and adjustments were decided with SRAM during the development. The 160 mm travel version comes stock a little stiffer than most riders are probably used to. This goes for the high un-sprung pressure as well, which does not negatively affect the rear shock either. The 140 mm travel models rear shock is set on the softer side. For the race, I went to the RockShox service team and had them make final adjustments to my suspension system. Due to my weight and my preference for stiffer suspension, the RockShox team set me up accordingly.

“Double butted, hydro-formed tubing and a clean system integration (with easy to change external battery) saved quite a lot of weight without sacrificing durability.”

Jens

The eWME comes stock with durable 2.35” Schwalbe tyres, which keeps the bike fast and give them plenty of grip on the trail. My test bike had (put in name after) tyres which I rode at 2 bars. However, the eWME can also be set up with 2.6 tyres as well.

The RockShox Yari RC 160 mm fork keeps downhill riding smooth.

The RockShox Yari RC 160 mm fork keeps downhill riding smooth.

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Brakes

To come to a stop, the eWME 627 is outfitted with Shimano Deore BR-M615 disc brakes. Braking at speed is never an issue, due to the 203 mm rotor in the front and 180 mm rotor in the rear. When riding, the bike feels prepared for every situation and the brakes offer full power, all the time.

Cable/hose routing

The cables and hoses are internally routed. This keeps the frame looking clean and prevents the cables and hoses from slapping around.

Shimano Deore brakes bring the eWME 627 to a safe stop.

Shimano Deore brakes bring the eWME 627 to a safe stop.

The 203 mm front rotor.

The 203 mm front rotor.

The 180 mm rear rotor.

The 180 mm rear rotor.

All the cables and hoses are run internally.

All the cables and hoses are run internally.

Initial Test

The eWME 627 that I tested in Riva del Garda was great on the uphill and shredded on the down. Before I took part in the Bosch E-MTB Challenge, I had ridden other E-MTBs to get ready, but nothing compared to the performance from Conway. It is agile and lightweight enough that in a race it saves battery and it can be pedalled uphill without motor assist without a problem. Often I forgot I was riding an E-MTB.

Every bit of what Jen Steinhäuser said is true!

To be clear, Conway focused on the weight of the bike during development. At 20.6 kg, it is one of the lightest E-MTBs on the market.

The eWME 627 in action.

The eWME 627 in action.

Summary

Fun on the trail was definitely a highlight of Conway’s eWMEs. The 627 model was extremely agile and lightweight, making it all the more shreddy. The motor assist is set up just right, especially in trail mode, making riding even more of an experience. The Shimano motor is quiet and the battery lasts quite a while. After riding 35 km with 1.200 m of altitude gain, the battery was still 3/4 full. For those who like to ride Enduro, this is your E-MTB! Head to our webpage if you want to sign up for your own test ride.

Blog comments are published with first name and first letter of surname.
Blog comments are published with first name and first letter of surname.